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256 Sheppard Ave. West
Toronto, ON M2N 1N3
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How to Puppy Proof Your Home

Puppies are an amazing addition to your home but they come with a lot of maintenance. This includes making sure that your property is safe for the puppy. When it comes to making your house safe, think of your puppy like they are a toddler. They’ll go where they shouldn’t go, they’ll eat what they shouldn’t eat, they’ll scratch what they shouldn’t scratch. It is your responsibility to protect not only your house from your puppy but your puppy from your house.

 

Dangerous Items

Unfortunately, these come in abundance. The best way to avoid a problem is to educate yourself on everything that can be dangerous and take preventative measures.

 

  • Medications. Any type of medications are dangerous for a puppy if they get their paws on them. You need to keep these locked away in closed cabinets that are off the ground and out of reach. Puppies are incredibly agile, which makes even leaving medication out on a high counter dangerous and even plastic containers may not keep them out.
  • Cleaning Supplies. Laundry detergent, dish soap, Clorox, it’s all dangerous for puppies. Like with medicine, this should be kept high and shut away where a puppy can’t even see it. They are naturally curious creatures and so even seeing something on a remotely accessible surface makes them that much more likely to get to it.
  • Electrical Cords. The number of injuries a puppy can sustain from electrical cords alone could be enough to make you want to pack them all away permanently. Chewing on one can result in burns, shock, and electrocution. Make sure you keep them wrapped up, out of the way, and unplugged when you aren’t using them and consider getting covers for the cords to protect your puppy from them.
  • Plants. They may be pretty, but a number of houseplants are actually poisonous to animals. DO some research on the plants that you have to find out if they could be harmful to your puppy and either move them to high places or replace them with safe plants.
  • Sharp Objects. Look around carefully at everything in your house and assess whether or not it is sharp. Pencils, scissors, fishing hooks, toothpicks, paper clips, anything. Make sure you keep all of that as far out of reach as you can from your puppy and be careful not to leave them unattended in areas where you may have these types of things stored.
  • Drapery Cords. In looking around at what in your house might be dangerous, it is likely that these never crossed your mind. But puppies are energetic and unpredictable and these cords are thin. If your puppy gets tangled up in them, it could result in strangulation. Before to keep them tied up off of the ground where your puppy can’t reach even if they jump.
  • Small Objects. Coins, pins, floss, jewelry, elastics, anything is fair game. Your house will never be as clean as right before you get a puppy because just about anything that a puppy could potentially fit into his mouth needs to be kept out of sight and out of reach.
  • Trash Cans. Everything you put in a trash can is potentially hazardous to a puppy whether it be people food or face wipes. There are dozens of dangers in what you put in the trash can from used razors to sanitary products to plastic wrap. Keep your trash cans in cabinets or up high, just keep them away from your pup.
  • People Food. While certain types of food are fine and even healthy for a dog to eat, a number of things that we think are harmless to a puppy actually aren’t. Chocolate is only one of the most known ones but things like onion, meat trimmings, even chicken bones can all be incredibly harmful to your puppy. Unless you know for sure that what you are feeding them is safe, avoid leaving any food out anywhere in your house. They will find it.
  • Do you have a cat? Cat litter boxes are unfortunately a gold mine to a puppy. Keep them in a room that the puppy doesn’t have access to or keep them where the pup can’t reach but the cat can because they will eat anything in there.

 

 

Dangerous Areas

On top of the items you need to keep away from your puppy, there are also places and scenarios in your house to avoid.

 

  • Fire. Anywhere there is fire is hazardous. Never leave your puppy unattended near fireplaces and keep candles as far out of reach as possible. Even stoves and ovens whether they are wood burning or otherwise can be hazardous to your puppy.
  • Furniture. Your living room is full of it. If you have reclining chairs or rocking chairs, both can be dangerous to your puppy.  A rocking chair can injure their paws or tail and puppies can be prone to crawling underneath recliners.
  • Bathroom. On top of the dozens of hazardous items in your bathrooms, sinks, bathtubs, and toilets can all be dangerous for a puppy if they are full. Make sure to keep the door to the toilet closed off and to always drain your sinks and bathtubs so that if your puppy gets curious they won’t drown.
  • Doorways. Young puppies are followers and so for the first year or so, whenever you close a door, you should always be checking behind you to see if your little follower is there. Doors can easily damage their paws and their tails.
  • Any House Openings. This includes doors, windows, and maybe even cat doors. Keep all of these closed and screened off at all times to avoid your puppy falling through or escaping.
  • Use Gates. The easiest way to keep a puppy out of trouble is to keep them confined. Maybe confine them to the kitchen for the first little while with gates to keep them from running away. This will make it easy to keep an eye on them and give them a chance to grow up a bit before they get exposed to the dangers of the rest of the house. But this isn’t a license to keep your puppy locked up in one room at all times. Bring them around the house with you, let them sleep in their crate in your bedroom, and most importantly bring them outside to let them run around and get all of that puppy energy out.

 

 

Outside

Puppies need to go outside. They need to do their business, run and play. Before they do, you need to make sure not only that the inside of your house is safe, but that the outside is too.

 

  • Plants. Whether you want to replace them, dig them up, or close them off, you need to keep your puppy from eating anything that could be dangerous to them.
  • Pools. Of all the outside dangers, if you have a pool, that may be the biggest. Make sure that you keep your pool or hot tub closed off or covered whenever you have your puppy outside. If you have a gate make sure it is never left unlocked and if you don’t your eye should always be on your pup.
  • Garbage Cans. You have them. Your neighbors have them. Keep them closed at all times and make sure that you keep your puppy away.
  • Fire. Whether you have a fire pit or a grill outside you need to keep your puppy away so that they don’t get burned.
  • Take a walk. Your yard can have anything in it from broken glass or old plastic. Any of it can be dangerous to your puppy. Make sure to do a thorough sweep of your property before getting a dog and take a walk around whenever you take your puppy outside to make sure that they are safe.
  • Confine the area. Whether you are going to use an electric fence or an actual gate, finding a way to confine your puppy’s access is one of the most effective ways to keep them safe outside.

 

Never leave them unsupervised. This is the biggest thing when it comes to a pup. They are like a small child but faster. You should always have an eye on your puppy outside for at least the first half a year that they are with you and even after that part of your attention should always be on your pup.

 

Contact us!

Call to schedule an appointment today at one of our four convenient Toronto locations. Ashbridges Bay Animal Hospital at (416) 915-7387, Beaches Animal Hospital at (416) 690-4040, Bloor Animal Hospital at (416) 767-5817, Downtown Animal Hospital at (416) 966-5122.

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