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Open 24 Hours, Year Round

256 Sheppard Ave. West
Toronto, ON M2N 1N3
(416) 222-5409

Pet Owner’s Manual

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Dental Care for Pets

Why Your Pet Needs Dental Care – Just Like You!

Every toothpaste commercial stresses to us just how important our dental healthcare is, but how often do you see commercials stressing the dental health of your pets? Well, it’s just as important for them to have a clean and healthy mouth as it is for us. If you want to keep your dogs or cats as healthy as they can be, it’s important to be educated on just why you should be caring for their teeth.

 

The statistics? 85% of all pets have periodontal disease by the time they are three years old.

 

Dental disease is just as much of a threat to your pets as it is to you if not more. Periodontal disease, or gum disease, can result in bad breath and tooth loss and can make it painful for your pets to chew their food. But aside from the direct effects that gum disease can have on the mouth of your pet, the bacteria that cause can also travel to your pet’s kidneys, liver, and heart, resulting in other health problems.

 

What causes gum disease in pets?

The same thing that causes it in humans. It comes from plaque. Plaque results from food particles and bacteria combining and as days pass, mineral in the saliva bond with that plaque to form a hard substance called tartar that solidifies on teeth.

The longer it is left untouched, the more likely that bacteria is to work its way under the teeth and cause inflammation or gingivitis. The bacteria will continue to destroy the tissue resulting in tooth loss. Simple dental plaque has thus turned into gum disease or periodontal disease.

 

How would you know if your pet was suffering from gum disease?

That can be tricky. Unfortunately, dogs and cats are very good at hiding their pain and so if they are struggling with tooth pain you may never notice. However, there are other things that you can watch out for that is often due to some kind of dental health problem.

Bad breath, for starters. This is not only a symptom in dogs and cats but humans as well. You may think that because they are animals it is natural that their breath might not smell great, but if their bad breath has become very noticeable it is likely a sign of tooth problems.

Drooling. Again, this is not just some normal pet behavior. If your dog or cat is drooling persistently then you should get their mouths checked out.

Fidgeting or pawing at their mouth. If your dog or cat is pawing at their mouth, this is most likely a sign of discomfort in their teeth that could be a result of gum disease.

Chewing difficulty. This is another sign of pain or discomfort in your pet’s teeth.

Brownish coloring around the base of their teeth. This is plaque, and the more plaque that builds up, the more at risk they are of disease. Any brown-gold discoloring at the base of their teeth needs to be removed with a dental cleaning.

Bleeding or inflammation of their gums. Maybe you notice that your pet’s gums are looking especially red or appear to be bleeding. It may seem like a no-brainer, but people are very prone to ignoring clear signs of something being wrong.

Tooth loss. Don’t wait, you need to take your pet to the vet to get their teeth checked out. Catching gum disease in its early stages is essential to prevent irreparable damage and if your pet is exhibiting tooth loss, not due to external circumstance, then gum disease has likely already set in.

 

What can you do?

Take your pet for dental cleanings. You can even get them one of those dental bones that is meant to act as a toothbrush. Prevention is the best way to treat any type of disease and so you want to do everything possible to prevent gum disease in your pets. Check their teeth regularly and make sure that there is no apparent plaque buildup or inflammation.

 

Keeping a pet’s dental health up to par not only spares them the pain of gum disease but will make your household a happier place. You work to take care good care of your teeth. Why shouldn’t you do the same for your pet?

 

Contact us!

Call to schedule an appointment today at one of our four convenient Toronto locations. Ashbridges Bay Animal Hospital at (416) 915-7387, Beaches Animal Hospital at (416) 690-4040, Bloor Animal Hospital at (416) 767-5817, Downtown Animal Hospital at (416) 966-5122.

Dental Care for Pets

Why Your Pet Needs Dental Care – Just Like You!

Every toothpaste commercial stresses to us just how important our dental healthcare is, but how often do you see commercials stressing the dental health of your pets? Well, it’s just as important for them to have a clean and healthy mouth as it is for us. If you want to keep your dogs or cats as healthy as they can be, it’s important to be educated on just why you should be caring for their teeth.

 

The statistics? 85% of all pets have periodontal disease by the time they are three years old.

 

Dental disease is just as much of a threat to your pets as it is to you if not more. Periodontal disease, or gum disease, can result in bad breath and tooth loss and can make it painful for your pets to chew their food. But aside from the direct effects that gum disease can have on the mouth of your pet, the bacteria that cause can also travel to your pet’s kidneys, liver, and heart, resulting in other health problems.

 

What causes gum disease in pets?

The same thing that causes it in humans. It comes from plaque. Plaque results from food particles and bacteria combining and as days pass, mineral in the saliva bond with that plaque to form a hard substance called tartar that solidifies on teeth.

The longer it is left untouched, the more likely that bacteria is to work its way under the teeth and cause inflammation or gingivitis. The bacteria will continue to destroy the tissue resulting in tooth loss. Simple dental plaque has thus turned into gum disease or periodontal disease.

 

How would you know if your pet was suffering from gum disease?

That can be tricky. Unfortunately, dogs and cats are very good at hiding their pain and so if they are struggling with tooth pain you may never notice. However, there are other things that you can watch out for that is often due to some kind of dental health problem.

Bad breath, for starters. This is not only a symptom in dogs and cats but humans as well. You may think that because they are animals it is natural that their breath might not smell great, but if their bad breath has become very noticeable it is likely a sign of tooth problems.

Drooling. Again, this is not just some normal pet behavior. If your dog or cat is drooling persistently then you should get their mouths checked out.

Fidgeting or pawing at their mouth. If your dog or cat is pawing at their mouth, this is most likely a sign of discomfort in their teeth that could be a result of gum disease.

Chewing difficulty. This is another sign of pain or discomfort in your pet’s teeth.

Brownish coloring around the base of their teeth. This is plaque, and the more plaque that builds up, the more at risk they are of disease. Any brown-gold discoloring at the base of their teeth needs to be removed with a dental cleaning.

Bleeding or inflammation of their gums. Maybe you notice that your pet’s gums are looking especially red or appear to be bleeding. It may seem like a no-brainer, but people are very prone to ignoring clear signs of something being wrong.

Tooth loss. Don’t wait, you need to take your pet to the vet to get their teeth checked out. Catching gum disease in its early stages is essential to prevent irreparable damage and if your pet is exhibiting tooth loss, not due to external circumstance, then gum disease has likely already set in.

 

What can you do?

Take your pet for dental cleanings. You can even get them one of those dental bones that is meant to act as a toothbrush. Prevention is the best way to treat any type of disease and so you want to do everything possible to prevent gum disease in your pets. Check their teeth regularly and make sure that there is no apparent plaque buildup or inflammation.

 

Keeping a pet’s dental health up to par not only spares them the pain of gum disease but will make your household a happier place. You work to take care good care of your teeth. Why shouldn’t you do the same for your pet?

 

Contact us!

Call to schedule an appointment today at one of our four convenient Toronto locations. Ashbridges Bay Animal Hospital at (416) 915-7387, Beaches Animal Hospital at (416) 690-4040, Bloor Animal Hospital at (416) 767-5817, Downtown Animal Hospital at (416) 966-5122.

Dental Care for Pets

Why Your Pet Needs Dental Care – Just Like You!

Every toothpaste commercial stresses to us just how important our dental healthcare is, but how often do you see commercials stressing the dental health of your pets? Well, it’s just as important for them to have a clean and healthy mouth as it is for us. If you want to keep your dogs or cats as healthy as they can be, it’s important to be educated on just why you should be caring for their teeth.

 

The statistics? 85% of all pets have periodontal disease by the time they are three years old.

 

Dental disease is just as much of a threat to your pets as it is to you if not more. Periodontal disease, or gum disease, can result in bad breath and tooth loss and can make it painful for your pets to chew their food. But aside from the direct effects that gum disease can have on the mouth of your pet, the bacteria that cause can also travel to your pet’s kidneys, liver, and heart, resulting in other health problems.

 

What causes gum disease in pets?

The same thing that causes it in humans. It comes from plaque. Plaque results from food particles and bacteria combining and as days pass, mineral in the saliva bond with that plaque to form a hard substance called tartar that solidifies on teeth.

The longer it is left untouched, the more likely that bacteria is to work its way under the teeth and cause inflammation or gingivitis. The bacteria will continue to destroy the tissue resulting in tooth loss. Simple dental plaque has thus turned into gum disease or periodontal disease.

 

How would you know if your pet was suffering from gum disease?

That can be tricky. Unfortunately, dogs and cats are very good at hiding their pain and so if they are struggling with tooth pain you may never notice. However, there are other things that you can watch out for that is often due to some kind of dental health problem.

Bad breath, for starters. This is not only a symptom in dogs and cats but humans as well. You may think that because they are animals it is natural that their breath might not smell great, but if their bad breath has become very noticeable it is likely a sign of tooth problems.

Drooling. Again, this is not just some normal pet behavior. If your dog or cat is drooling persistently then you should get their mouths checked out.

Fidgeting or pawing at their mouth. If your dog or cat is pawing at their mouth, this is most likely a sign of discomfort in their teeth that could be a result of gum disease.

Chewing difficulty. This is another sign of pain or discomfort in your pet’s teeth.

Brownish coloring around the base of their teeth. This is plaque, and the more plaque that builds up, the more at risk they are of disease. Any brown-gold discoloring at the base of their teeth needs to be removed with a dental cleaning.

Bleeding or inflammation of their gums. Maybe you notice that your pet’s gums are looking especially red or appear to be bleeding. It may seem like a no-brainer, but people are very prone to ignoring clear signs of something being wrong.

Tooth loss. Don’t wait, you need to take your pet to the vet to get their teeth checked out. Catching gum disease in its early stages is essential to prevent irreparable damage and if your pet is exhibiting tooth loss, not due to external circumstance, then gum disease has likely already set in.

 

What can you do?

Take your pet for dental cleanings. You can even get them one of those dental bones that is meant to act as a toothbrush. Prevention is the best way to treat any type of disease and so you want to do everything possible to prevent gum disease in your pets. Check their teeth regularly and make sure that there is no apparent plaque buildup or inflammation.

 

Keeping a pet’s dental health up to par not only spares them the pain of gum disease but will make your household a happier place. You work to take care good care of your teeth. Why shouldn’t you do the same for your pet?

 

Contact us!

Call to schedule an appointment today at one of our four convenient Toronto locations. Ashbridges Bay Animal Hospital at (416) 915-7387, Beaches Animal Hospital at (416) 690-4040, Bloor Animal Hospital at (416) 767-5817, Downtown Animal Hospital at (416) 966-5122.

Willowdale Animal Hospital News

Picasso was such an amazing boy who brought so much love and joy into our lives. It was not easy to say good bye but we know he’s in a better place now. We love you forever boo boo. xoxo

Miss you forever, but I know you’re in the arms of the angels.

Thank you to Dr. Kilburn and all the staff at Beaches Animal Hospital for showing such compassion to our feline companion in her final hours. Seeing the loving care you provided our Abbey has helped us in our bereavement as we know she was in kind hands. Abbey was a gentle, loyal and affectionate kitty… [Read More]

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