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Open 24 Hours, Year Round

256 Sheppard Ave. West
Toronto, ON M2N 1N3
(416) 222-5409

Pet Owner’s Manual

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Kids and Pets

How to Introduce Pets and Children

One of the trickiest parts of getting a pet is having kids. No doubt a pet is a great contribution to your household but when they’re going to be sharing the space with your kids, that first meeting might be a little worrisome. But while a bird is going to spend most of its time in a cage and a cat is fine minding its own business, puppies can be unpredictable so it’s important to know the best way to introduce them to your kids and what to watch out for.

 

For starters, why is your pup more likely to bite a child?

It has nothing to do with them being a dog or being young and it is generally not because they’re a mean dog. Kids are more unpredictable, and to a puppy, that can be scary. Kids will move fast or energetically, unaware that this could potentially frighten the dog. It’s best to try to keep your child as calm as possible when introducing them to a dog. Prepare them as best as you can, making sure that they know that to be calm and gentle and that this new friend is not a toy.

Another reason is that most children are unaware of their relationship to the dog, whether it is how close they are physically or understanding that the pup is a living creature. Your child may accidentally trip over the dog or step on his tail, unaware that they are doing anything wrong. Regardless, that can be threatening or even painful to a dog or a puppy who doesn’t know what’s going on, causing them to lash out. You need to be sure that your child is very aware of themselves around the dog and that they know that the pup is not a play toy.

 

How to avoid a bad situation

The first rule: never leave your dog and your child alone. They may have a great relationship, but animals and children can be unpredictable. Maybe your child will get upset and start screaming, or maybe a garbage truck outside will frighten the dog. The only way to avoid these situations is to always be supervising.

Don’t let your child rush up to a dog or treat the like a toy whether it is your own or not. Dogs are not meant to be ridden and they do not alway react well to a small human running into their face.

But aside from how you should prep your child, you need to consider the dog as well. If you notice that your dog is uncomfortable whether it is with the way your child is playing with them or if they are being teased, you need to stop it. Take the child away or move the dog somewhere that they can feel safe.

On top of that though, if your pup does start growling at your child, do NOT punish them. Growling is how they are communicating that they are uncomfortable and the more you suppress it, the less likely they are to let you know they’re uncomfortable which could lead to a bad situation.

 

What you can do to make the meeting go smoothly

Educate your child. That is the biggest weapon you have against any conflict between your pet and the child. They need to know to be careful and gentle with the pup and they need to understand that a dog is not a toy and that it is a living being that needs to be cared for and respected.

But aside from educating your child on the nature of a dog, you need to educate them on how to approach the dog, whether they are your own or a dog they see on the streets. If they are meeting a dog that is not your own, not only does your child need to know to ask the owner first if it is okay to pet the dog, they need to be informed on the correct way to make sure petting is okay with the dog. Have your child put out their hand in a low fist and see if the dog if the dog comes to them. Once he or she has finished sniffing and decided that they are not a threat, then your child may be able to gently and slowly pet them. This goes for meeting any new dog including one you’re introducing to your household.

 

It is also important to know the safest way for a child to pet the dog. Once they’ve gotten the okay, your child should know to pet the dog on the back and not the head. A hand suddenly approaching a dog’s head may appear to them as a threat and they may be more likely to defend themselves.

Finally, you need to be alert at all times. Be ready to intervene, whether that is grabbing your child away from a stranger’s dog or picking up the puppy to keep them away from your kid. Even doing everything right, something can still go wrong so even if your child is alert and prepared, you need to be too.

 

Contact us!

Call to schedule an appointment today at one of our four convenient Toronto locations. Ashbridges Bay Animal Hospital at (416) 915-7387, Beaches Animal Hospital at (416) 690-4040, Bloor Animal Hospital at (416) 767-5817, Downtown Animal Hospital at (416) 966-5122.

 

Kids and Pets

How to Introduce Pets and Children

One of the trickiest parts of getting a pet is having kids. No doubt a pet is a great contribution to your household but when they’re going to be sharing the space with your kids, that first meeting might be a little worrisome. But while a bird is going to spend most of its time in a cage and a cat is fine minding its own business, puppies can be unpredictable so it’s important to know the best way to introduce them to your kids and what to watch out for.

 

For starters, why is your pup more likely to bite a child?

It has nothing to do with them being a dog or being young and it is generally not because they’re a mean dog. Kids are more unpredictable, and to a puppy, that can be scary. Kids will move fast or energetically, unaware that this could potentially frighten the dog. It’s best to try to keep your child as calm as possible when introducing them to a dog. Prepare them as best as you can, making sure that they know that to be calm and gentle and that this new friend is not a toy.

Another reason is that most children are unaware of their relationship to the dog, whether it is how close they are physically or understanding that the pup is a living creature. Your child may accidentally trip over the dog or step on his tail, unaware that they are doing anything wrong. Regardless, that can be threatening or even painful to a dog or a puppy who doesn’t know what’s going on, causing them to lash out. You need to be sure that your child is very aware of themselves around the dog and that they know that the pup is not a play toy.

 

How to avoid a bad situation

The first rule: never leave your dog and your child alone. They may have a great relationship, but animals and children can be unpredictable. Maybe your child will get upset and start screaming, or maybe a garbage truck outside will frighten the dog. The only way to avoid these situations is to always be supervising.

Don’t let your child rush up to a dog or treat the like a toy whether it is your own or not. Dogs are not meant to be ridden and they do not alway react well to a small human running into their face.

But aside from how you should prep your child, you need to consider the dog as well. If you notice that your dog is uncomfortable whether it is with the way your child is playing with them or if they are being teased, you need to stop it. Take the child away or move the dog somewhere that they can feel safe.

On top of that though, if your pup does start growling at your child, do NOT punish them. Growling is how they are communicating that they are uncomfortable and the more you suppress it, the less likely they are to let you know they’re uncomfortable which could lead to a bad situation.

 

What you can do to make the meeting go smoothly

Educate your child. That is the biggest weapon you have against any conflict between your pet and the child. They need to know to be careful and gentle with the pup and they need to understand that a dog is not a toy and that it is a living being that needs to be cared for and respected.

But aside from educating your child on the nature of a dog, you need to educate them on how to approach the dog, whether they are your own or a dog they see on the streets. If they are meeting a dog that is not your own, not only does your child need to know to ask the owner first if it is okay to pet the dog, they need to be informed on the correct way to make sure petting is okay with the dog. Have your child put out their hand in a low fist and see if the dog if the dog comes to them. Once he or she has finished sniffing and decided that they are not a threat, then your child may be able to gently and slowly pet them. This goes for meeting any new dog including one you’re introducing to your household.

 

It is also important to know the safest way for a child to pet the dog. Once they’ve gotten the okay, your child should know to pet the dog on the back and not the head. A hand suddenly approaching a dog’s head may appear to them as a threat and they may be more likely to defend themselves.

Finally, you need to be alert at all times. Be ready to intervene, whether that is grabbing your child away from a stranger’s dog or picking up the puppy to keep them away from your kid. Even doing everything right, something can still go wrong so even if your child is alert and prepared, you need to be too.

 

Contact us!

Call to schedule an appointment today at one of our four convenient Toronto locations. Ashbridges Bay Animal Hospital at (416) 915-7387, Beaches Animal Hospital at (416) 690-4040, Bloor Animal Hospital at (416) 767-5817, Downtown Animal Hospital at (416) 966-5122.

 

Kids and Pets

How to Introduce Pets and Children

One of the trickiest parts of getting a pet is having kids. No doubt a pet is a great contribution to your household but when they’re going to be sharing the space with your kids, that first meeting might be a little worrisome. But while a bird is going to spend most of its time in a cage and a cat is fine minding its own business, puppies can be unpredictable so it’s important to know the best way to introduce them to your kids and what to watch out for.

 

For starters, why is your pup more likely to bite a child?

It has nothing to do with them being a dog or being young and it is generally not because they’re a mean dog. Kids are more unpredictable, and to a puppy, that can be scary. Kids will move fast or energetically, unaware that this could potentially frighten the dog. It’s best to try to keep your child as calm as possible when introducing them to a dog. Prepare them as best as you can, making sure that they know that to be calm and gentle and that this new friend is not a toy.

Another reason is that most children are unaware of their relationship to the dog, whether it is how close they are physically or understanding that the pup is a living creature. Your child may accidentally trip over the dog or step on his tail, unaware that they are doing anything wrong. Regardless, that can be threatening or even painful to a dog or a puppy who doesn’t know what’s going on, causing them to lash out. You need to be sure that your child is very aware of themselves around the dog and that they know that the pup is not a play toy.

 

How to avoid a bad situation

The first rule: never leave your dog and your child alone. They may have a great relationship, but animals and children can be unpredictable. Maybe your child will get upset and start screaming, or maybe a garbage truck outside will frighten the dog. The only way to avoid these situations is to always be supervising.

Don’t let your child rush up to a dog or treat the like a toy whether it is your own or not. Dogs are not meant to be ridden and they do not alway react well to a small human running into their face.

But aside from how you should prep your child, you need to consider the dog as well. If you notice that your dog is uncomfortable whether it is with the way your child is playing with them or if they are being teased, you need to stop it. Take the child away or move the dog somewhere that they can feel safe.

On top of that though, if your pup does start growling at your child, do NOT punish them. Growling is how they are communicating that they are uncomfortable and the more you suppress it, the less likely they are to let you know they’re uncomfortable which could lead to a bad situation.

 

What you can do to make the meeting go smoothly

Educate your child. That is the biggest weapon you have against any conflict between your pet and the child. They need to know to be careful and gentle with the pup and they need to understand that a dog is not a toy and that it is a living being that needs to be cared for and respected.

But aside from educating your child on the nature of a dog, you need to educate them on how to approach the dog, whether they are your own or a dog they see on the streets. If they are meeting a dog that is not your own, not only does your child need to know to ask the owner first if it is okay to pet the dog, they need to be informed on the correct way to make sure petting is okay with the dog. Have your child put out their hand in a low fist and see if the dog if the dog comes to them. Once he or she has finished sniffing and decided that they are not a threat, then your child may be able to gently and slowly pet them. This goes for meeting any new dog including one you’re introducing to your household.

 

It is also important to know the safest way for a child to pet the dog. Once they’ve gotten the okay, your child should know to pet the dog on the back and not the head. A hand suddenly approaching a dog’s head may appear to them as a threat and they may be more likely to defend themselves.

Finally, you need to be alert at all times. Be ready to intervene, whether that is grabbing your child away from a stranger’s dog or picking up the puppy to keep them away from your kid. Even doing everything right, something can still go wrong so even if your child is alert and prepared, you need to be too.

 

Contact us!

Call to schedule an appointment today at one of our four convenient Toronto locations. Ashbridges Bay Animal Hospital at (416) 915-7387, Beaches Animal Hospital at (416) 690-4040, Bloor Animal Hospital at (416) 767-5817, Downtown Animal Hospital at (416) 966-5122.

 

Willowdale Animal Hospital News

When most people go into a shelter, they are immediately drawn to those adorable little puppies. You know, the ones who will chew up your entire house, pee on every carpet, but still have just the cutest faces. Well, here’s a secret: when a dog looks up at you with those big eyes, they’re adorable… [Read More]

No matter what age we are, most of us crave some type of companionship. This need only tends to intensify as people age. Oddly enough, company isn’t the only thing that owning a pet can offer as one gets deeper into their senior years. In fact, there are many impressive benefits to owning a pet… [Read More]

Sometimes older people feel their lives become monotonous.  They may get lonely, run down, and stuck in a rut. Fortunately, there’s is a simple solution to bring a new light to the life of a senior and that’s owning a pet. Animal companions can erase feelings of loneliness and give variety and emotional depth to… [Read More]

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