Toronto Veterinarians - Pet Wellness Network


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Open 24 Hours, Year Round

256 Sheppard Ave. West
Toronto, ON M2N 1N3
(416) 222-5409

Pet Owner’s Manual

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Pet Diabetes

Is Your Pet at Risk for Diabetes?

Our pets are out adorable, lovable, loyal companions, but a lot of times we forget that they can have health problems just like us. If your pet has or is at risk for diabetes, it could change a lot about how you care for them from the type of food they eat to how often you can put food out. The best way to avoid running into a sticky health situation is to know the warning signs ahead of time.

 

Risk Factors

Diabetes is surprisingly common in pets but there are certain factors that can contribute to their risk of developing the condition.

 

  • Breed. All dog and cat breeds are not the same, and their health isn’t either. Burmese cats, for example, are more prone to diabetes than any other breed of cat with about one in ten developing it later in their lifetime. When it comes to dogs, there are a number of breeds that are more likely to suffer from diabetes such as German Shepherds, Australian Terriers andPoodles. Other dog breeds that have an increased risk of diabetes are Cairn Terriers, Fox Terriers, Samoyeds, Schnauzers, Bichon Frise, Pugs, Golden Retrievers, and Keeshonden.
  • Age. Dogs are most likely to develop diabetes between the ages of 7 and 9 but there have also been numerous cases of a juvenile version of the disease in puppies. Cats are most likely to suffer from diabetes between 8 and 13.
  • Sex. In cats, males are more likely to become diabetic than females while in dogs, females are twice as likely to develop diabetes than males.
  • Medical Conditions. In both dogs and cats, having Cushing’s Disease increases their risk for diabetes. Cushing’s is when your pet’s body is making too much of the hormone cortisol, resulting in a small pea-sized tumor either at the base of their brain, the pituitary gland, or their adrenal glands above the kidneys. The other medical condition that shows increased risk for diabetes is pancreatitis.
  • Obesity. This is an avoidable risk factor but is one of the most well-known paths to diabetes. Make sure that you are keeping your pet on a regular feeding schedule and be careful to watch their weight. This can be a bigger problem in cats that stay indoors.
  • Medications. Certain medications your pet may need can have a negative impact on their production of insulin such as glucocorticoids and progestagens. If your pet is taking either of these make sure that you watch them carefully to see if there are any changes in their habits that might indicate diabetes.

 

 

Symptoms

The next step to keeping your pet healthy is not just knowing that if they are at an increased risk of diabetes but being able to recognize the symptoms.

  • Hunger. This may not be noticeable through the amount that they are eating if you keep them on a regular schedule but if you notice your pet whining or scratching consistently for more food, it could be a sign that they have diabetes.
  • Weight Loss. Your pet may seem to be hungrier, but if they suddenly lose weight then it may an indication that something else is going on. Diabetes cause and an increase in your pet’s metabolism that explains a sudden weight loss in your pet.
  • Thinning Hair. If you begin to notice your pet’s hair dulling or thinning without an apparent cause you may want to talk to your vet. This can not only be a sign of diabetes but a sign of many other illnesses as well.
  • Increased Urination. Frequent urination whether it be that your pet starts having accidents in the house or starts needing to go outside more is an early warning sign of diabetes.
  • Fatigue. Diabetes can cause your pet’s muscles to wear out more quickly resulting in weakness and exhaustion. If you notice that your pet is unable to get up and spends a lot more time napping than usual, it could be a sign of diabetes.
  • Depression. Depression can be caused be a later sign of diabetes called Ketoacidosis. This is when the breakdown of fats and proteins in the liver result in metabolic acidosis in response to a lack of insulin. This creates an imbalance in your pet’s body that results in depression.
  • Vomiting. This is another side effect of Ketoacidosis. If your pet’s diabetes has gone unnoticed for a long time this is a late sign. The stage of Ketoacidosis is more common in older females as well as in miniature poodles and dachshunds.

 

Contact us!

Call to schedule an appointment today at one of our four convenient Toronto locations. Ashbridges Bay Animal Hospital at (416) 915-7387, Beaches Animal Hospital at (416) 690-4040, Bloor Animal Hospital at (416) 767-5817, Downtown Animal Hospital at (416) 966-5122.

Pet Diabetes

Is Your Pet at Risk for Diabetes?

Our pets are out adorable, lovable, loyal companions, but a lot of times we forget that they can have health problems just like us. If your pet has or is at risk for diabetes, it could change a lot about how you care for them from the type of food they eat to how often you can put food out. The best way to avoid running into a sticky health situation is to know the warning signs ahead of time.

 

Risk Factors

Diabetes is surprisingly common in pets but there are certain factors that can contribute to their risk of developing the condition.

 

  • Breed. All dog and cat breeds are not the same, and their health isn’t either. Burmese cats, for example, are more prone to diabetes than any other breed of cat with about one in ten developing it later in their lifetime. When it comes to dogs, there are a number of breeds that are more likely to suffer from diabetes such as German Shepherds, Australian Terriers andPoodles. Other dog breeds that have an increased risk of diabetes are Cairn Terriers, Fox Terriers, Samoyeds, Schnauzers, Bichon Frise, Pugs, Golden Retrievers, and Keeshonden.
  • Age. Dogs are most likely to develop diabetes between the ages of 7 and 9 but there have also been numerous cases of a juvenile version of the disease in puppies. Cats are most likely to suffer from diabetes between 8 and 13.
  • Sex. In cats, males are more likely to become diabetic than females while in dogs, females are twice as likely to develop diabetes than males.
  • Medical Conditions. In both dogs and cats, having Cushing’s Disease increases their risk for diabetes. Cushing’s is when your pet’s body is making too much of the hormone cortisol, resulting in a small pea-sized tumor either at the base of their brain, the pituitary gland, or their adrenal glands above the kidneys. The other medical condition that shows increased risk for diabetes is pancreatitis.
  • Obesity. This is an avoidable risk factor but is one of the most well-known paths to diabetes. Make sure that you are keeping your pet on a regular feeding schedule and be careful to watch their weight. This can be a bigger problem in cats that stay indoors.
  • Medications. Certain medications your pet may need can have a negative impact on their production of insulin such as glucocorticoids and progestagens. If your pet is taking either of these make sure that you watch them carefully to see if there are any changes in their habits that might indicate diabetes.

 

 

Symptoms

The next step to keeping your pet healthy is not just knowing that if they are at an increased risk of diabetes but being able to recognize the symptoms.

  • Hunger. This may not be noticeable through the amount that they are eating if you keep them on a regular schedule but if you notice your pet whining or scratching consistently for more food, it could be a sign that they have diabetes.
  • Weight Loss. Your pet may seem to be hungrier, but if they suddenly lose weight then it may an indication that something else is going on. Diabetes cause and an increase in your pet’s metabolism that explains a sudden weight loss in your pet.
  • Thinning Hair. If you begin to notice your pet’s hair dulling or thinning without an apparent cause you may want to talk to your vet. This can not only be a sign of diabetes but a sign of many other illnesses as well.
  • Increased Urination. Frequent urination whether it be that your pet starts having accidents in the house or starts needing to go outside more is an early warning sign of diabetes.
  • Fatigue. Diabetes can cause your pet’s muscles to wear out more quickly resulting in weakness and exhaustion. If you notice that your pet is unable to get up and spends a lot more time napping than usual, it could be a sign of diabetes.
  • Depression. Depression can be caused be a later sign of diabetes called Ketoacidosis. This is when the breakdown of fats and proteins in the liver result in metabolic acidosis in response to a lack of insulin. This creates an imbalance in your pet’s body that results in depression.
  • Vomiting. This is another side effect of Ketoacidosis. If your pet’s diabetes has gone unnoticed for a long time this is a late sign. The stage of Ketoacidosis is more common in older females as well as in miniature poodles and dachshunds.

 

Contact us!

Call to schedule an appointment today at one of our four convenient Toronto locations. Ashbridges Bay Animal Hospital at (416) 915-7387, Beaches Animal Hospital at (416) 690-4040, Bloor Animal Hospital at (416) 767-5817, Downtown Animal Hospital at (416) 966-5122.

Pet Diabetes

Is Your Pet at Risk for Diabetes?

Our pets are out adorable, lovable, loyal companions, but a lot of times we forget that they can have health problems just like us. If your pet has or is at risk for diabetes, it could change a lot about how you care for them from the type of food they eat to how often you can put food out. The best way to avoid running into a sticky health situation is to know the warning signs ahead of time.

 

Risk Factors

Diabetes is surprisingly common in pets but there are certain factors that can contribute to their risk of developing the condition.

 

  • Breed. All dog and cat breeds are not the same, and their health isn’t either. Burmese cats, for example, are more prone to diabetes than any other breed of cat with about one in ten developing it later in their lifetime. When it comes to dogs, there are a number of breeds that are more likely to suffer from diabetes such as German Shepherds, Australian Terriers andPoodles. Other dog breeds that have an increased risk of diabetes are Cairn Terriers, Fox Terriers, Samoyeds, Schnauzers, Bichon Frise, Pugs, Golden Retrievers, and Keeshonden.
  • Age. Dogs are most likely to develop diabetes between the ages of 7 and 9 but there have also been numerous cases of a juvenile version of the disease in puppies. Cats are most likely to suffer from diabetes between 8 and 13.
  • Sex. In cats, males are more likely to become diabetic than females while in dogs, females are twice as likely to develop diabetes than males.
  • Medical Conditions. In both dogs and cats, having Cushing’s Disease increases their risk for diabetes. Cushing’s is when your pet’s body is making too much of the hormone cortisol, resulting in a small pea-sized tumor either at the base of their brain, the pituitary gland, or their adrenal glands above the kidneys. The other medical condition that shows increased risk for diabetes is pancreatitis.
  • Obesity. This is an avoidable risk factor but is one of the most well-known paths to diabetes. Make sure that you are keeping your pet on a regular feeding schedule and be careful to watch their weight. This can be a bigger problem in cats that stay indoors.
  • Medications. Certain medications your pet may need can have a negative impact on their production of insulin such as glucocorticoids and progestagens. If your pet is taking either of these make sure that you watch them carefully to see if there are any changes in their habits that might indicate diabetes.

 

 

Symptoms

The next step to keeping your pet healthy is not just knowing that if they are at an increased risk of diabetes but being able to recognize the symptoms.

  • Hunger. This may not be noticeable through the amount that they are eating if you keep them on a regular schedule but if you notice your pet whining or scratching consistently for more food, it could be a sign that they have diabetes.
  • Weight Loss. Your pet may seem to be hungrier, but if they suddenly lose weight then it may an indication that something else is going on. Diabetes cause and an increase in your pet’s metabolism that explains a sudden weight loss in your pet.
  • Thinning Hair. If you begin to notice your pet’s hair dulling or thinning without an apparent cause you may want to talk to your vet. This can not only be a sign of diabetes but a sign of many other illnesses as well.
  • Increased Urination. Frequent urination whether it be that your pet starts having accidents in the house or starts needing to go outside more is an early warning sign of diabetes.
  • Fatigue. Diabetes can cause your pet’s muscles to wear out more quickly resulting in weakness and exhaustion. If you notice that your pet is unable to get up and spends a lot more time napping than usual, it could be a sign of diabetes.
  • Depression. Depression can be caused be a later sign of diabetes called Ketoacidosis. This is when the breakdown of fats and proteins in the liver result in metabolic acidosis in response to a lack of insulin. This creates an imbalance in your pet’s body that results in depression.
  • Vomiting. This is another side effect of Ketoacidosis. If your pet’s diabetes has gone unnoticed for a long time this is a late sign. The stage of Ketoacidosis is more common in older females as well as in miniature poodles and dachshunds.

 

Contact us!

Call to schedule an appointment today at one of our four convenient Toronto locations. Ashbridges Bay Animal Hospital at (416) 915-7387, Beaches Animal Hospital at (416) 690-4040, Bloor Animal Hospital at (416) 767-5817, Downtown Animal Hospital at (416) 966-5122.

Willowdale Animal Hospital News

Picasso was such an amazing boy who brought so much love and joy into our lives. It was not easy to say good bye but we know he’s in a better place now. We love you forever boo boo. xoxo

Miss you forever, but I know you’re in the arms of the angels.

Thank you to Dr. Kilburn and all the staff at Beaches Animal Hospital for showing such compassion to our feline companion in her final hours. Seeing the loving care you provided our Abbey has helped us in our bereavement as we know she was in kind hands. Abbey was a gentle, loyal and affectionate kitty… [Read More]

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